Movie Review: Land of the Lost

mc_011_cmpmain_020032r_rgb“Captain Kirk’s nipples!” shouts Will Ferrell as he realizes that he’s just been upstaged by co-star Danny McBride.

Land of the Lost stars Will Ferrell as Dr. Rick Marshall, a quantum paleontologist who is trying to find a way to travel through time and space into other dimensions. Anna Friel comes along for the ride as Holly Cantrell, an expert of many things that Marshall is not. Danny McBride plays Will Stanton, a redneck who owns a cave that the two want to explore. In this cave, a portal opens and they are all three sucked into the land of the lost.

This movie was based off of the original tv series from 1974. It was supposed to be campy and cheesy as well as deliver much humor. Check those off your list, because from the opening credits, it was successful. It was, however supposed to be a kid’s film as well as a film for the adults who grew up watching the show and screaming every Saturday morning when the Sleestaks came on screen. The problem with this is, I colotl_stills0040r_rgbuldn’t tell at times if it was just an adult movie, or just a kid’s movie. There really was no happy medium that let me feel like the whole family could enjoy this film.

At the times when I felt it was targeted at kids, I felt a bit bored. Only being entertained by my eyes, my brain had shut off. Then when the adult humor kicked in, such as Will Stanton trying to sell a boobie coffee mug to Rick Marshall, or the sexual innuendo between Rick Marshall and ape man, Chaka, I felt a moment of embarrassment for all of the parents who brought their kids to this and were currently covering eyes or explaining things to them that they hadn’t planned on bringing up for a few years.

Will Ferrell’s acting in st024cmpmainmain0021rcthis was mediocre at best. At times, I felt like he was doing his impressions of George Bush, while other times just felt like a poorly written SNL skit. He was very funny at times with his one-liners or facial emotions, but it was Danny McBride who was the real star of this film. Almost every line he delivered was funny. There were times in the film, it felt like the two stars were ad-libbing their way through a scene, only McBride was nailing it with every line and Ferrell came off as awkward at times.

One scene that was particularly funny by both was when they found the crystal portal door and when they put their hands on it, it vibrated everything on them, including their vocal chords. They both placed their hands on the crystal and began singing a duet rendition of Cher’s “Do You Believe In Life After Love”. Just when they had everyone in the audience laughing though, they threw out some humor much too adult for kids to hear, “Hey, Holly, you should sit on this thing” Will Stanton referring to the vibrating.

fs045_cmpmain_f0146I did, however, enjoy all the dinosaurs in the film and how good they looked. All of the creepy crawly bugs and creatures in the film looked just that. The Sleestaks and Enik were obviously a man in a suit and that made it funny. The repertoire between McBride and Ferrell was enjoyable as well.

So, even though I had quite a few laughs in this film and knew it would be cheesy, I probably wouldn’t recommend it for anyone. Mainly, because I don’t know what group of people to recommend it too. It’s not right for kids, a little boring for adults, I guess teenagers might get a kick out of it. Basically, only see this if you are a fan of Danny McBride’s work. Just one more to add to the collection.

I give the film 3 “Chakas” out of 5.

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by Angela Davis

About Angela

Angela is the Editor-in-Chief of Lost in Reviews. She and Ryan created Lost in Reviews together in 2009 out of a mutual hatred for all the stodgy old farts currently writing film reviews. Since launching the site, Angela has enjoyed reviewing indie films over all other films, picking up new music from all corners of the world and photographing live shows. She is the co-host of Blu Monday and a member of the Kansas City Film Critic Circle.



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