Stanley Kubrick’s “Fear And Desire” Finally Available On Blu-Ray/DVD

As far as I’m concerned, Kubrick is THE best director ever. I’m an avid fan of his, and snatch up every single double dip release that Warner Bros. shamefully puts out, just because. Recently, The Criterion Collection has been getting ahold of Kubrick’s older lesser known films, such as The Killing, Killer’s Kiss, and Path’s Of Glory and giving them fantastic releases. Although, it’s a little strange to see Criterion not acquire the rights to Fear And Desire, it’s still awesome to see SOMEONE putting it out.

Kino Lorber Inc. announces the release of Stanley Kubrick’s rarely-seen first feature film, FEAR AND DESIRE, newly restored by the Library of Congress.

The event marks a major milestone for Kubrick aficionados as, in the years since its original release in 1953, FEAR AND DESIRE has rarely screened to the public, and has never been given a proper video release in any format.

This film has been restored at the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Virginia, and will debut on Blu-ray and DVD on October 23, 2012.

ABOUT THE FILM

An existential war film that is often compared with Kubrick’s PATHS OF GLORY (1957)-among three Kubrick films selected for the Library’s National Film Registry-and FULL METAL JACKET (1987), FEAR AND DESIRE follows a squad of soldiers who have crash-landed behind enemy lines and must work their way downriver to rejoin their unit.

In the process, they encounter a peasant girl (Virginia Leith) and tie her to a tree, where she is tormented by a mentally unbalanced soldier (future director Paul Mazursky).  Before making their escape, the soldiers determine the location of an enemy base and formulate a plot to assassinate its commanding officer.

Independently financed, and shot by a skeleton crew – with Kubrick controlling almost every aspect of production – FEAR AND DESIRE was conceived as a European-style art film, cloaked in the guise of a Hollywood war picture.  Kubrick described the film to distributor Joseph Burstyn as allegorical and poetic. “A drama of ‘man,’ lost in a hostile world-deprived of material and spiritual foundations-seeking his way to an understanding of himself, and of life around him.”

By Richard Pepper

 

About Richard

Richard is an awesome dude, maybe the most awesome ever? He writes for Lost In Reviews, owns lots of blu-rays, spends his free time obsessing over the works of Trent Reznor, and is a cat lover.

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