Movie Review: That Awkward Moment by Jason Burleson

That Awkward Moment

Normally, movies about relationships aren’t really my thing.  Let’s be honest, most of them are the same. Guy meets girl, girl falls in love with guy, guy takes forever to realize he’s in love and does something stupid, and then guy apologizes so they can live happily ever after.  It’s been done.  These are your typical romantic comedies.  That Awkward Moment I hate to say is exactly that.  However, this film might be more than just an awkward title as well.

In this film, you’ll be introduced to three really good friends, each with a different story to tell. The first, Jason (Zac Efron), is your dreamy, good looking, heartthrob kind of guy.  The kind of guy every girl falls in love with but most girls quickly realize he is only in it for one thing.  The next guy, Daniel (Miles Teller), is the funny, quick-witted, and charming kind of guy.  He’s kind of goofy but always has a comeback for every situation. He has a lot in common with Jason.  Charm and quick talking seem to get him in bed with lots of girls but he is not easily satisfied and quickly moves on.  Thirdly, you have the last and final piece to the team, Mikey (Michael B. Jordan).  This guy married young, right out of college, and is getting to that point in his relationship where he’s starting to question if this is really what he wants. His wife is seeing someone else and Mikey has decided he needs to figure his situation out.  All three are hell on wheels, driving a flaming dick-shaped motorcycle through the streets of love town.

AWOD_DAY_24_0513.NEFThe film revolves around a simple idea.  The first two guys are like most young guys and question the validity of needing to be in a relationship.  Sex is great.  In order for them to have as much as possible and not get tied down, they will only ride it out as far as they need to. Building up a roster of girls they can call when the moment comes to them, and not working with anyone else’s time frame.  I found the character Mikey brought a lot of balance to the story.  While they are all friends, Mikey obviously wanted to do the right things from the beginning, or at least what he thought were the right things. Go to school, become a doctor, get married…blah, blah, blah.  Only this time his wife is the one not so keen on the details.  Together they all question their priorities and ride the roller coaster that is relationships.

My first thoughts upon seeing this film were that I was going to be watching one long frat party turned into a movie.  The first part of the movie just happens to be exactly like this.  The comedic chemistry between the three main characters is really what makes this film anything and is spot on.  Anyone who watches them tell their juvenile and raunchy jokes will forget they are watching that guy from High School Musical and Hairspray.  This movie is really funny.  Zac Efron plays a perfect not-so-grownup grownup whom most will enjoy.  The other two actors, Miles Teller and Michael B. Jordan are two fairly new and up and coming man childs I expect to see much more from.  Teller was in The Spectacular Now and Jordan you will remember from Chronicle and Fruitvale Station.  Jordan also has plans to play Johnny Storm in the new Fantastic Four reboot.

While I found some of the screenplay was a bit banter driven, most audience members will not be disappointed watching these three deal with their bromantic love triangle and female dynamic that intertwines.  Eventually, That Awkward Moment does get serious, which may throw you off for a moment as it did me.  It quickly recovers though.  Honestly, I found this to be a solid romantic comedy that will most importantly leave you in stitches from all the idiotic situations these guys wind up in. Apparently, hipster New Yorkers are slightly retarded. Don’t let that stop you.  This is definitely a smart, fun film for today’s audience.

I give That Awkward Moment 3 “General Lees” out of 5.

by Jason Burleson

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